Connecticut Plants
Blue Ground Cedar (Deeproot Clubmoss)
Diphasiastrum tristachyum (Pursh) Holub

The name "blue ground cedar" comes from the fact that the foliage resembles cedar leaves and is usually blue-green, but sometimes the blue is subtle. It is not related to cedars.

  • Synonyms: Lycopodium tristachyum Pursh
  • Family: clubmoss (Lycopodiaceae)
  • Habitat: dry, acid soil in open woods, clearings, old pastures, and power cuts
  • Height: 7 to 14 inches
  • Location of spores: in strobili at the top of branched vertical stalks
  • Persistence: evergreen
  • Origin: native

Photographed near Glastonbury, Connecticut in early June


Photographed at Millinocket Lake, Maine in mid-August.


Close-up of immature strobili (spore-bearing structures). When mature, they will be yellow. Photographed at Millinocket Lake, Maine in mid-August.