CBS logo Connecticut Botanical Society
Connecticut Ferns
Photos & Information
blank for formatting
Wildflowers
blank for formatting
>Ferns
blank for formatting
Rare Plants
blank for formatting
Gardening with
  Native Plants
blank for formatting
Plant ID Guides
blank for formatting
Links

The Society
blank for formatting
Home
blank for formatting
Field Trips
blank for formatting
Meetings
blank for formatting
Newsletter
blank for formatting
Membership
blank for formatting
Get Involved
blank for formatting
Contact Us
blank for formatting
About this Web Site

blank pixels for layout
Northern Adder's-tongue
Ophioglossum pusillum (Ophioglossum vulgatum var. pseudopodum)

Northern adder's-tongue doesn't look much like a fern, as it has a single, oval sterile frond, and a single fertile frond that looks like a double row of beads on a stalk. In Connecticut, it is a threatened plant, though it is more common in northern New England. The plant shown was photographed in Maine.

• Family: Ophioglossaceae
• Habitat: fields, ditches, and woods in soil that is acidic and seasonally wet
• Height: 5-12 inches
• Location of spores: on a separate fertile frond at the apex of the main frond
• Stipe (leaf stalk): green, smooth and fragile
• Growth pattern: single leaf
• Persistence: deciduous

next fern
next rare plant
Ophioglossum pusillum


This is the fertile part of northern adder's-tongue. The spores are released through the horizontal slits.


Last updated November 25, 2005. © 2005 Connecticut Botanical Society. All rights reserved.